Main content

'Football's grim reaper got me': Premiership Pie calls it quits

Guess who's feeling punchy, Eagles up for fight, trade latest Nat Edwards and Mitch Cleary with all the latest news

COLLINGWOOD veteran Tyson Goldsack has announced he will retire at the end of the Magpies' finals campaign.

The experienced swingman, 31, hasn't played an AFL game this season but will continue to train with the senior squad. 

Goldsack will live in hope that he can in some way repeat his heroics of last year, when he suffered a serious left knee injury in March but made a remarkable return to become the first player in history whose only four games in a season were finals. 

 

Goldsack, who has spent the season in defence in the VFL, has rarely been in the selection frame this season despite the Pies again suffering a raft of injuries, and in more recent times the less experienced rookie-listed defender Jack Madgen has been favoured over him.

A member of the Pies' 2010 premiership team, the popular utility told teammates on Tuesday of his plans. 

Goldsack revealed that he and his wife Chelsea had decided 12 months ago that this would be his last season. They will relocate to Adelaide with their two daughters in the new year.

"I gave it one more year but football's grim reaper got me," Goldsack, who has played 165 games in 13 seasons, said. 

"But I'm content. How could I not be? I realised all of my football dreams, met some outstanding and interesting people and, in a sense, grew up with Collingwood's arm around me. 

"Chelsea and I made the call after the Grand Final last year to relocate to South Australia in 2020, so we've been preparing for the next chapter. 

"I hope I did the jumper proud and thank the many, many people who helped me along the way." - Tyson Goldsack 

Collingwood coach Nathan Buckley paid tribute to Goldsack for his qualities as both a player and a clubman. 

"From his earliest days 'Goldy' was always one of the most intense players in the contest. His speed and courage either in the air or on the ground quickly earned the respect of his teammates," Buckley said.

"He was also a great clubman, someone people liked to spend time with. In the confines of a football club, who you are is as important as what you can do and Goldy is a first-class human."