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January 17, 2013 12:41 PM

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Robbie Warnock on the track

I don’t think I've missed a session so far
ROBBIE Warnock's quest to re-establish himself in Carlton's ruck division has started in promising fashion, with the injury-prone big man in terrific shape after completing every session so far this pre-season.

Warnock played just five games last year before suffering a season-ending shoulder injury that required surgery.

However, the Blues showed great faith by re-signing him until the end of 2015, and a fitter and stronger Warnock feels as prepared as ever to prove his worth.

"I don’t think I've missed a session so far … to be out there and training, it's great because I've only done that probably one other pre-season, so hopefully it's a step in the right direction," he told CFC TV.

The former Fremantle player, who turns 25 on January 19, said that simply being able to do all the running and gym work was an improvement on previous pre-seasons, when shoulder issues hadn’t allowed him to "do weights properly". Now he is adding muscle to his 206-centimetre and 103-kilogram frame.

"Usually when you have surgery you take a step back, and then by the time the season comes around you’re kind of back to where you left off, so the fact I can actually start where I left off and build on that is great," he said.

"I can actually put some weight on, so it's a good feeling.

"Just being out there and getting the k's in the legs is really good. There's no substitute for the fitness (you get) out there, so the fact that I'm out there hopefully means that I'm a step ahead of where I have been last year and years before."

Warnock is pleased that he is fulfilling the wishes of his coaches, who want him to add some size and fitness and improve his contested marking.

He also said the Blues were benefiting from shorter training sessions at higher intensity.

"Hopefully that all adds up to improvement," he said.