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Blues want Ikon Park to host women's league

Carlton CEO Steven Trigg - ${keywords}
Carlton CEO Steven Trigg
We would love to see this as the home of women's footy
Carlton CEO Steven Trigg on Ikon Park

CARLTON hopes its Ikon Park headquarters can become the home of the upcoming national women's football league.

Carlton CEO Steven Trigg reiterated on Wednesday the Blues' strong desire to win one of the licences to field a women's team when the national competition starts next season.

Trigg also said the club hoped Ikon Park could be redeveloped in time to host women's football games from next season.

"We would love to see this as the home of women's footy," Trigg said at the launch of the Northern Football League girls football development program.

"It's got every attribute to be able to do that. We're in the early stages of a master plan, which has been well publicised, and building specific facilities for girls and women is very much in our plans."

Trigg said the ground at Ikon Park would not need much of an upgrade to host women's games, with any redevelopment to focus on the venue's grandstands and changerooms.

"But it's very doable, very quickly," he said.

Carlton will partner with AFL Victoria on the NFL girls football development program, a venture that Trigg says the Blues are excited to be part of.

New Melbourne-based stadiums have been on the agenda recently, with Collingwood president Eddie McGuire proposing the construction of a 60,000-seat stadium in the Olympic Park precinct, and Richmond seeking to revive plans for a Punt Road Oval redevelopment.

Asked whether Carlton would consider championing Ikon Park as an alternative AFL venue, Trigg said the Blues were "not absolutely bashing the door down for that to happen" given the AFL had given no indication it would fixture games there.

Trigg also said Carlton was "100 per cent supportive" of the new illicit drugs policy amid the furore surrounding a News Corp report that up to 11 Collingwood players recorded positive hair tests under the new regime.

"Our view is as a club we need to give it a chance to settle. It's a really good policy," Trigg said.

"It is, in fact, a zero tolerance policy. It's not as though you can swan around on a strike, it just doesn't happen that way.

"There are suspended sanctions in place and in behind that a really significant amount of work going on culturally that needs some time to grip.

"Yeah, there's been some noise, but we would say that the AFL and Mark Evans in particular in driving it have done a fantastic job.

"We need to give it a shot in terms of getting it to work."